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Kenya Airways Forced To Explain ‘Sellotape’ On Its Plane’s Engine

A picture of what looks like a sellotape stuck on a KQ plane's engine [Photo/Courtesy]

Kenya Airways (KQ) has been forced to respond to claims of one of its planes being fitted with a ‘sellotape ‘.

This is following concerns by a section of social media users who questioned the safety of the national carrier after photos of what looks like a tape stuck on one of KQ’s planes went viral.

In a series of tweets, KQ confirmed that the material on one of its planes, as depicted on pictures, is actually a special tape that is used to do ‘minor repairs’ on aircraft.

“The tape on the plane as depicted in the pictures – is professionally known as high-speed tape, an aluminium pressure-sensitive tape used to do minor repairs on aircraft and racing cars,” said KQ.

According to the carrier, the tape is used as a temporary repair material until a more permanent repair can be carried out.

“It has an appearance similar to duct tape, for which it is sometimes mistaken, but its adhesive is capable of sticking on an aeroplane fuselage or wing at high speeds, hence the name, ” the airline stated.

Read: Ethiopian Man Jailed For Making “Bomb Joke” Aboard KQ Jo’burg Bound Flight

The airline assured its customers that its planes are safe and that there was no reason for alarm.

“Rest assured that the safety of our passengers is our top priority.”

Here are photos of the aluminium pressure-sensitive tape:

Aluminium pressure-sensitive tape [Photo/KQ]

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Wycliffe

Written by Wycliffe

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