Evans Masaku Kasyoka

Citizen TV’s investigative desk has revealed how rogue next-of-kins could be killing their relatives with life insurance covers in order to get insurance compensation.

On Sunday, Caroline Mwambia, Citizen crimes reporter revealed how Evans Masaku Kasyoka alias Kidero could have been involved in his nephew’s death,Eric Makau Musyoka, in a bid to get compensation proceeds worth Ksh9 million after being listed as the benefactor.

Musyoka owned two life insurance policies, one with Jubilee insurance worth Ksh1 million while the other one was with AIG Insurance, worth Ksh8 million.

However, according to family members, Musyoka was extremely poor, and could not afford to pay such insurance policies, drawing possibilities that the insurance policies could have been masterminded by his uncle, with the aim of killing him (Musyoka) in order to reap the benefits.

The AIG insurance policy was filed three days to his death, raising eyebrows on whether Musyoka could have predicted his death.

In the investigations done by the journalist, Evans camouflaged to Musyoka, in disguise of looking for a job at Jubilee Insurance before he filled the insurance policy.

This was revealed by a Forensic Document Report from the Directorate of Criminal Investigation (DCI) by C. I Michira Ndege, which said, “In my opinion, the handwritings were made by the same author.”

Ndege was talking about the job application form and the insurance policy application form, pointing fingers to Evans Masaku, the main murder suspect.

However, Evans denies knowing whether Musyoka had any insurance policy. He says that he knew about the policies after Musyoka’s death.

The family reveals that the two, Evans and Musyoka, once had a fight at a local pub. A year after the fight, it is when Musyoka was murdered and his body dumped near their home. A postmortem report indicated that he died from “severe head injury secondary to trauma from blunt object.”

On the fateful day of Musyoka’s death, call logs from Safaricom showed that the two spent the whole day together, up to around 2AM.

Knowing that the deal was almost done, Evans came back to the family a week after the burial of his nephew, demanding the burial permit. He said that he was a guarantor in a loan Musyoka had taken.

“The following week, his uncle (Evans) came demanding for the burial permit. I asked him what it was for, and he lied that he was a guarantor. He did not even tell me about the insurance policies,” says Charles Kinama, the late Musyoka’s father.

The family could not entrust him with the documents. He therefore decided to go his own way, and within two weeks he had fraudulently obtained Musyoka’s death certificate, a second one from the one the family had been issued with.

He then used the documents, which were legitimate but obtained fraudulently to launch compensation claim at the two companies. As per the norm, the insurance companies launched their investigations before compensation, which seemed to have caught Evans off-guard and made him mad at the companies.

He started to push the companies to expedite the compensation, even before the investigations were over.

“Even the hardest stone has something that can break it. There is nothing without a solution in this world,” read one of Evans’ ‘warning’ messages to the companies.

He even wrote an email claiming that he was travelling abroad for further studies, hence he needed to get feedback on the issue.

As the suspect pushed to have his ‘blood’ money, the parents and siblings of the deceased languished in pain and agony of the loss. The man who had caused the death of their son got off scot-free, and the police seemed not to care.

Read: Nairobi’s Notorious Laptop Thieves Arrested In DCI Swoop

This prompted the father to write to the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), requesting him to help in prosecuting the suspect, who was eating life ‘with a big spoon’, as the remains of Musyoka lay on the grave crying for justice.

“This will reduce more pain and anguish surrounding my son’s death,” said Mr Kinama in the letter to DPP.

In response, officers at the Kangundo Police Station issued a warrant of arrest against Evans, only through a letter issued to Musyoka’s father who could do nothing much on it. This meant that they were on their own.

When the investigative journalist traced him down, he refused to talk to her and ran to Central Police Station where he was arrested and taken to Kangundo Police station, where he was wanted.

However, the suspect was released under unclear circumstances before being taken to court as planned.

The officer in charge of DCI in Kangundo said that documents concerning Evans’ case had disappeared, prompting his release. As at Now, Evans remains free, presenting a case of justice denied, and a possibility of him getting blood money from the insurance companies.

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