Grieving Mr. Namatsi

A parent has petitioned the parliament in Kenya to help him know why his daughter had to succumb to treatable illness in a Nakuru school despite having medical cover.

According to Josephat Namatsi,  his 15-year-old daughter (Tracy Sylvia) who was a student at the Moi High School Kabarak in Nakuru died on January 14. The death was surprising as Tracy had just left home a week before.

According to Mr Namatsi, the school first refused to let Tracy take a sick-off despite telling them that she was weak to even stay in class, leading to the collapse of the student in class and being taken comatose. The school clinic diagnosed her to be suffering to “a bacterial infection” while the hospital she was rushed to diagnosed her to be suffering from Malaria.

The Late Tracy Namatsi

Despite the loud claims by Dr. Matiang’i that he is carrying out educational reforms, neither the school nor the Ministry has responded to the grieving parent who is desperately seeking to know why and what made his daughter die from treatable illness while she had a medical cover to the tune of Ksh 8million.

The school which is owned by former President, Daniel Arap Moi, did not care to inform the parent that the daughter was sick nor did they care to inform him of her death, leaving the Evans Sunrise Hospital to break the sad news.

The internal auditor later found out that Tracy went to the Kabarak University Medical Centre on complaining of aches fever where a nurse diagnosed her to be suffering from a bacterial infection. She was only given antibiotics and told to go back to school. She collapsed in class the following day and was rushed to the same health centre with probably the most incompetent and clueless medics.

The team of clueless medics could not diagnose even Malaria and transferred her to Evans Sunrise Hospital.

So Mr Namatsi has petitioned parliament through Mumias East MP Benjamin Washiali to help provide the family with closure and find ways of getting standard best practices in handling such situations in schools in the future.