Intel Corporation and the Kenya Institute of Education have today announced a joint commitment to roll out a digital education curriculum which has been in development for some time. The curriculum is set to transform how students interact with teachers in the classroom.

The event was graced by KIE Director Lydia Nzomo and Intel Regional Director in-charge of Africa, Middle east and Turkey, Ms Aysegul Ildeniz. Intel has been working with KIE for the last 3 years in the areas of development of the digital curriculum for Maths and Sciences for class 4 – 7. Ms Aysegul said that Intel has such programs in Middle East and Africa and the tech giant spends over $100 Million each year in their Education related CSR programs.

Intel will provide digital content through Intel Skoool Learning and Teaching Technology program and also help create localised content and train teachers and curriculum developers on software development. Skoool.com is an interactive internet resource for learning Mathematics and Science which are key in innovation. The digital learning model has been promoted in South Africa, Nigeria, Egypt, Libya, Zambia, Ghana and now in Kenya.

Ms Aysegul said that Intel will continue to work closely with the government of Kenya on educational programs geared towards ensuring that more Kenyan kids enroll in school, stay in school and receive high quality of education that equips them with knowledge and skills for the future.

KIE Director, Ms Lydia Nzomo, says the organisation is also working with Intel to develop a Curriculum Innovation Centre which will help in curriculum and academic research and development.

To date, Intel has invested more than $ 1 Billion in more than 60 countries including Kenya to roll out the e-learning initiatives and is also a partner in Clinton Global Initiative to bridge the digital divide. Through the Intel tech program, the tech company has trained more that 9 Million teachers from all over the world to use PCs in the classroom and is also donating more than 100,000 PCs to developing nations including Kenya to help accelerate technology use in the classroom.